Useful NGINX Ingress Controller Configurations for Kubernetes using Helm

My favourite Ingress Controller for Kubernetes is definitely the official NGINX Ingress Controller. It provides tons of customisation and is under active development with great community support. This post will dive into some of the more useful nginx ingress controller configurations and options available.

If you use the official stable/nginx-ingress chart for Helm, the default values you’ll get with installation are not always the best choices.

This is my collection of useful / common configuration options I tend to change when installing an ingress controller. A few of these options are geared towards AWS deployments, but otherwise the rest of the options are generic enough to apply to any platform you may be running on.

Useful nginx ingress controller options for Kubernetes

AWS only configuration options

  • Use an internal (private) Elastic Load Balancer for Ingress. Annotate with: service.beta.kubernetes.io/aws-load-balancer-internal: 0.0.0.0/0
  • Specify the kind of AWS Load Balancer to use with Ingress Controller. Annotate with: service.beta.kubernetes.io/aws-load-balancer-type: nlb/elb/alb

Common configuration options

  • controller.service.type (default == LoadBalancer) – specifies the type of controller service to create. Useful to open up the Ingress Controller for North/South traffic with differing models of access. E.g. Cluster only with ClusterIP, NodePort for specific host only access, or LoadBalancer to expose with a public or internal facing Load Balancer.
  • controller.scope.enabled (default == disabled / watch all namespaces) – where the controller should look out for ingress rule resources. Useful to limit the namespace(s) that the Ingress Controller works in.
  • controller.scope.namespace – namespace to watch for ingress rules if the controller.scope.enabled option is toggled on.
  • controller.minReadySeconds – how many seconds a pod needs to be ready before killing the next, during update – useful for when updating/upgrading the Ingress Controller deployment.
  • controller.replicaCount (default == 1) – definitely set this higher than 1. You want at least 2 for replicaCount to ensure there is always a controller running when draining nodes or updating your ingress controller.
  • controller.service.loadBalancerSourceRanges (default == []) – Useful to lock your Ingress Controller Load Balancer down. For example, you might not want Ingress open to 0.0.0.0/0 (all internet) and instead assign a value that restricts ingress access to an IP range you own. Using helm, you can specify an array with typical array square brackets e.g. [10.0.0.0/8, 172.0.0.0/8]
  • controller.service.enableHttp (default == true) – Useful to disable insecure HTTP (and leave only HTTPS)
  • controller.stats.enabled (default == false) – Enables controller stats page – Useful for stats and debugging. Not a good idea for production though. The controller stats service can be locked down if required by specific CIDR range.

To deploy the NGINX Ingress Controller helm chart and specify some of the above customisations, you can create a yaml file and populate it with the following example configuration (replace/change as required):

controller:
  replicaCount: 2
  service:
    type: "LoadBalancer"
    loadBalancerSourceRanges: [10.0.0.0/8]
    targetPorts:
      http: http
      https: http
    annotations:
      service.beta.kubernetes.io/aws-load-balancer-internal: 0.0.0.0/0
      service.beta.kubernetes.io/aws-load-balancer-backend-protocol: "http"
      service.beta.kubernetes.io/aws-load-balancer-ssl-ports: "https"
      service.beta.kubernetes.io/aws-load-balancer-connection-idle-timeout: '3600'
  stats:
    enabled: true

Install with helm like so:

helm install -f ingress-custom.yaml stable/nginx-ingress --name nginx-ingress --namespace example

If you’re using an internal elastic load balancer (like the above example yaml configuration), don’t forget to make sure your private subnets are tagged with the following key/value:

key = “kubernetes.io/role/internal-elb”
value = “1”

Enjoy customising your own ingress controller!

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