Hashcat RTX 3090 Benchmarking and Performance

hashcat rtx 3090 benchmarking

I picked up an nVidia RTX 3090 toward the end of last year. In hindsight, I was lucky to have purchased it early on soon after release. The GPU shortage has caused a massive spike in prices and this card is now worth double what I originally paid for it! Anyway, acquisition story aside, I was curious how it would perform in a Hashcat benchmark (all) run. Here are my Hashcat RTX 3090 benchmark results.

For a quick and easy run I’m using the hashcat 6.2.2 (Windows) binary.

.\hashcat.exe -b --benchmark-all
hashcat rtx 3090 benchmark

The performance seems on-par if not slightly higher than some other RTX 3090 benchmarks I have seen around. An impressive set of results.

I am running the MSI GeForce RTX 3090 Ventus 3X OC 24GB model card. I upgraded from a GeForce 1080 Ti (12GB) model and the hashing speeds are way faster. The 3090 is a power hungry beast though. It gets hot and the fans are noisier than my 1080 Ti’s were. To ensure my system’s power delivery was up to the task, I also upgraded to a Seasonic Focus PX-850 850W 80+ Platinum at the same time.

Here is a shortened log of my benchmark –all run:

CUDA API (CUDA 11.2)
====================
* Device #1: GeForce RTX 3090, 23336/24576 MB, 82MCU

OpenCL API (OpenCL 1.2 CUDA 11.2.109) - Platform #1 [NVIDIA Corporation]
========================================================================
* Device #2: GeForce RTX 3090, skipped

Benchmark relevant options:
===========================
* --benchmark-all
* --optimized-kernel-enable

Hashmode: 0 - MD5
Speed.#1.........: 67033.9 MH/s (40.78ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:8

Hashmode: 10 - md5($pass.$salt)
Speed.#1.........: 66278.8 MH/s (41.26ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:8

Hashmode: 11 - Joomla < 2.5.18
Speed.#1.........: 64972.6 MH/s (42.10ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:8

Hashmode: 12 - PostgreSQL
Speed.#1.........: 64460.9 MH/s (42.44ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:8

Hashmode: 20 - md5($salt.$pass)
Speed.#1.........: 35775.1 MH/s (76.66ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:4

Hashmode: 21 - osCommerce, xt:Commerce
Speed.#1.........: 36124.8 MH/s (75.92ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:4

Hashmode: 22 - Juniper NetScreen/SSG (ScreenOS)
Speed.#1.........: 35747.7 MH/s (76.72ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:4

Hashmode: 23 - Skype
Speed.#1.........: 35632.9 MH/s (76.96ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:4

Hashmode: 24 - SolarWinds Serv-U
Speed.#1.........: 35107.4 MH/s (78.12ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 30 - md5(utf16le($pass).$salt)
Speed.#1.........: 65511.3 MH/s (41.73ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:4

Hashmode: 40 - md5($salt.utf16le($pass))
Speed.#1.........: 36398.3 MH/s (75.35ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:4

Hashmode: 50 - HMAC-MD5 (key = $pass)
Speed.#1.........: 10893.9 MH/s (62.90ms) @ Accel:8 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 60 - HMAC-MD5 (key = $salt)
Speed.#1.........: 22468.1 MH/s (60.99ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:512 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 70 - md5(utf16le($pass))
Speed.#1.........: 64396.2 MH/s (42.49ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 100 - SHA1
Speed.#1.........: 21045.1 MH/s (65.11ms) @ Accel:16 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 101 - nsldap, SHA-1(Base64), Netscape LDAP SHA
Speed.#1.........: 20874.3 MH/s (65.66ms) @ Accel:16 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 110 - sha1($pass.$salt)
Speed.#1.........: 21217.0 MH/s (64.60ms) @ Accel:32 Loops:512 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 111 - nsldaps, SSHA-1(Base64), Netscape LDAP SSHA
Speed.#1.........: 20608.3 MH/s (66.51ms) @ Accel:16 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Full results can be downloaded here:

As for the PC build around the RTX 3090, here are a few photos…

You might notice an AIO installed, but not connected – I was in the process of testing a dual 240mm radiator (AIO) versus a high performing Noctua air cooler, so had left it in the chassis during transition.

I’ll see if I can run the same benchmark suite on my uBuntu install and update the results here. I have not tested the RTX 3090 card under this OS yet so I’m not sure if I’ll run into any driver issues or not.

Funny story of how I ended up with an RTX 3090 (it is a bit overkill!)…

Back in September or October of 2020 (I forget when the 3xxx series launch was), I had pre-ordered the MSI RTX 3080 at MSRP. I was 180 or so in the pre-order queue after months of already waiting. My queue position was barely changing week over week and I got impatient. I saw a handful of RTX 3090 cards come in stock at a local retailer and purchased one.

These cards would generally remain in stock for a few days due to everyone holding out for the much cheaper (at the time) RTX 3080 pre-order promises.

It was a lucky break for me, as those 3080 cards never came for most in that queue. GPU mining and GPU shortages made sure of that. Prices sky rocketed. Looking up this card now I see it costs almost double what I originally paid last year (if you can even get stock that is).

Now I just hope the card lasts at least a few years or more so I don’t ever have to worry about RMA and stock levels…

nVidia introduces the worlds “first virtualized GPU”

 

I usually only ever follow nVidia and AMD with regard to their GPU offerings for gamers, this being one of my passtimes, however this press release of the green team’s the other day caught my attention.

 

To summarise, nVidia are unveiling their “VGX” platform, which will allow IT to deliver virtualized desktops with graphics or GPU computing power similar to, or as close to the real deal as possible, for users on any connected device (not necessarily just PCs or Thin clients for example). This VGX platform will consist of a few things, one of which will be the addon cards for servers that are passively cooled and as energy efficient as possible (interesting when considering how much power desktop gaming-grade GPUs generally consume!)

 

Some of the features nVidia are toting for their VGX platform thus far, according to their press release are:

 

  • GPU Accelerated desktops (of course)
  • Ultra-low latency remote display capability
  • Energy efficient, passively cooled hardware. Each board will have
    • 4 x GPUs (each with 192 CUDA architecture cores and a 4GB frame buffer).
    • 16GB memory
    • Industry standard PCI Express interface
  • VGX GPU Hypervisor
    • This is a software layer that should integrate with commercial hypervisors (VMware anyone?), enabling virtualization of the GPU
  • High user densities – shared graphics processing power for multiple users
    • (Up to 100 users to be served from a single server powered by one VGX board apparently)

 

Here are a few videos from the press release:

 

 

The article has mention of Citrix technology support, but what about VMware View? I am sure this type of integration should be available – I wonder how PCoIP would work to deliver virtual desktops accelerated by the VGX platform. If the latency reduction claims and acceleration benefits are anything to go by then we should be in for an even better VDI experience!